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Topic Subject:Pirated Games
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zeus8923
Pleb
posted 03-12-10 02:26 ET (US)         
I know you all are going to rip me up for this so here it goes. I Just got done reading the Code of Conduct for this site and I saw this:


"You may not encourage, post in support of, link to, or discuss activities, methods, and/or techniques involving piracy, cracks, multiplayer hacks, keys and key-generators. In addition, the following are grounds for moderator action on your post and/or account:

Seeking help to create cracks, multiplayer hacks and key-generators
Seeking missing files that are supplied with installation CD(s)
Admitting to possess pirated materials, cracks, multiplayer hacks and key-generators
Admitting to distribute pirated materials, cracks, multiplayer hacks, keys and key-generators
Admitting to the use of cracks, multiplayer hacks and key-generators
Uploading any such files to HeavenGames sites

Generally breaking this rule will result in an instant permanent ban. However you may be given a warning for a first offence if, in our opinion, you are a new forumer who doesn’t understand why this is such a strict rule – this will be explained to you; any subsequent offences will result in a permanent ban."


Well I am a new forumer who doesn't understand why this is such a strict rule, so can someone explain this to me and can we possibly debate about this issue?
AuthorReplies:
ladedadedum
Pleb
posted 08-18-10 15:54 ET (US)     26 / 57       
You are aware that alone in 2008, there was pirated (stolen) software for more then 5 Billion US$?
you're (and the people who made that statistic) assuming those are actual lost sales, and not from people who would otherwise not buy the game at all.

to say they lost 25% of their revenue (and was still able to turn a massive profit) is ridiculous.
To steal like that can never be morally right.
except it isn't stealing, just duplicating. there is a huge difference. if i make a copy of a song from a friend, my friend still has his copy, nothing is lost or stolen.

dinosaurs didn't go extinct from an asteroid, they died because they could no longer adapt to a rapidly changing world; they could no longer compete in the aftermath.

[This message has been edited by ladedadedum (edited 08-18-2010 @ 03:57 PM).]

Eswen
Pleb
posted 08-18-10 18:41 ET (US)     27 / 57       
Well I'd say a few things too, although I'm not particularly fond of the subject.

I agree that software developers should (if agreed upon) receive money for their work. But the sad truth is that the distribution companies are the side which actually takes the big money (in software, and in music).

As a software developer I use a huge amount of free software, including my Linux. The thing that bugs me is that even though I have a damn good hardware, I'm not able to play any of the newer games. Simple reason - I don't own a Windows. So why is that games are not made for Linux too? Most of the game engines are available for both GNU/Linux and Windows, but game companies are not compiling for us. Even I read somewhere that Bioware developers/salesmen were actually reprimanded for offering Neverwinter Nights for Linux as well. So, can you tell me that's okay or normal even?

On another note, if I ever decide to play newer games (practically everything from Caesar3 to now), I would NEED a crack. Not because I wouldn't buy my game, but because wine can't run all the crappy software protections they put in it.

All in all, do I "steal" if I crack my game, even if bought it?

Don't get me wrong, I've used windows in the past, I can even say I'm quite intimate with the system; and I'm not saying it is a bad one. The thing that pains me is that if I want to play, I don't really have any choice but to buy one ...
Brugle
HG Alumnus
posted 08-18-10 19:13 ET (US)     28 / 57       
All of us agreed (when we became members) to the forum Code of Conduct, including the quote in the opening post. In my opinion, anyone who honors their agreements but is not a hard-core supporter of "intellectual property" cannot discuss the issue here (since that could be considered encouragement of forbidden behavior).
Eswen
Pleb
posted 08-18-10 19:16 ET (US)     29 / 57       
I'm just exploring the issue, but point taken. I will not discuss it further.

Regards.
sanna
Pleb
posted 09-23-10 11:54 ET (US)     30 / 57       
Frankly, I see this discussion is going out of hand, and there are so many false assumptions about piracy it's a little painful to read.

Now, first of all, piracy is NOT theft. Theft means when you steal an existing product without paying for it. But when you copy a product, you never stole the existing product. You copied it. By definition piracy can therefore never be theft.

http://main.makeuseoflimited.netdna-cdn.com/tech-fun/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/piracy-is-not-theft.png

That copying an intellectual property is illegal in most, if not all, Western countries is another matter. But it is still wrong to call it theft. Period.

Furthermore, there is an assumption that just because you download something illegally you are never going to pay. This is wrong. More often than not, people want to download something because they do not want to take the financial risk in buying a product they might not find satisfying. However, when it turns out the product IS satisfying, they will most likely be more than willing to actually buy the product they just illegally downloaded.

Another issue of piracy is that the definitions of personal use are diffuse. You are for example allowed to make personal copies to share with friends and family, but what is friends and family in a globalized world? What if I live on one side on the continent and my family on another? Then the logical conclusion is that I can send a digital copy of what I own to my family. But since they now got a digital copy of my original copy, the law does not necessarily prohibit them in turn to share that digital copy with their friends and families.

Additionally, we have a huge problem when we think copyright is the end of all of protecting intellectual property. This is not the case. What copyright does is that it says that someone can own intellectual property by law. But this doesn't make any sense. If an inventor comes up with a new product the market has never seen, a company will probably buy the rights from that inventor to now be the owner of that invention, even though THEY WERE NEVER THE ONES WHO CAME UP WITH THE PRODUCT. The originator of the product is still the inventor. But the inventor does no longer own the product by law.

There are also other issues of copyright. How do we protect the spreading of ideas? Let's say that I come up with a new philosophical solution to all existing problems. I write a book about it. People read my book and they start talking about this new solution. Now, who actually OWNS the idea in the first place? The proper answer is everyone. You cannot take information from another person or claim that they knowledge they possess is not rightfully theirs. That's rediculous.

And my last and final issue I got with copyright is how the producers of intellectual property are not those who actually earn the most, the companies who distribute intellectual property are. And I find this mighty wrong. And even more so when said companies also buy the copyrights of the inventors of intellectual property so the companies can make more money. No, I cannot support the idea of intellectual property like that, not when it's capitalism that is the driving force behind the rules and legislations that is supposed to govern the protection of intellectual property.

I should also probably lastly emphasize, so people don't get me wrong on this, is that I fully and wholeheartedly support the developers of a game. What I got problems with is the legal system revolving intellectual property, because I find it faulty. We need a better system to protect intellectual property instead of keep insisting that the one we got is good enough if we just slam everyone enough on their fingers and saying, "No, no, bad boy!". It doesn't work that way and never has.

[This message has been edited by sanna (edited 09-23-2010 @ 11:59 AM).]

ColdCanuck
Pleb
(id: Coldviper)
posted 09-29-10 19:52 ET (US)     31 / 57       
It is only OK if the copyright holder of the game has said it is OK, otherwise it is morally and legally wrong.
But once again. Is it wrong to make an exact copy of something? I can do it on my computer by going to program files, right clicking, then left clicking the copy button. Another example is what if someone made an amazing recipe for Chocolate chip cookies. I analyze all the ingredients that went into that and then copy them and make my own recipe.

So now I see someone make a great game. I copy them all onto a CD that I bought. The recipe(The Files) were theirs. I copied them and gave[The cookies] them to my friends.

Then if were down to this suddenly if I change a single thing in the game it's a different game. So If I took Rome total war and modded it into say Europa Barborium and then took a modded version of that game and dumped it onto a disc and gave it to my friends. Is that right or wrong? I have taken many building blocks that Sega created and changed it into something that I made. Suddenly it is not Rome total war....It is Europa Barborium.
PCDania
Pleb
(id: PCD)
posted 09-30-10 04:10 ET (US)     32 / 57       
So now I see someone make a great game. I copy them all onto a CD that I bought. The recipe(The Files) were theirs. I copied them and gave[The cookies] them to my friends.
Have you ever read an EULA (End User License Agreement)? You really should start reading that agreement you click past when installing something.

If the copyright holder of a game say it's OK to make a copy and share with your friends, then it is OK. If the copyright holder say it is not OK, then it is not OK, some copyright holders even forbids sharing even a single file from the original program. Buying a game is like buying a ticket to the cinema. You don't own the movie, you have only paid for watching it. You don't own the game (program) you have paid for the right to use it. If you like to own a game (program) then you have to either buy the copyright, pay someone to make a game for you or make the game yourself. When making the game you may not break the copyright for some other game.

In many countries it is OK to make a single backup copy for own use, this copy may not be transferred to anyone else unless the original is enclosed (and uninstalled from your computer). If you keep the backup copy and use the original as a gift, then your are breaking the law. In some of those countries it is illegal to bypass the copy protection (yeah, I know but I didn't make the law). You will have to check the law in your country if it is legal to make a single backup copy for your own use.

"Cats are the only animals that are both uber, pwns and 1337 at the same time." -King Euric
By reading this fine print your soul is now the exclusive property of HeavenGames.
ColdCanuck
Pleb
(id: Coldviper)
posted 10-03-10 22:22 ET (US)     33 / 57       
You will have to check the law in your country if it is legal to make a single backup copy for your own use.
This is so utterly stupid that I would just tell the law to piss off.
If the copyright holder of a game say it's OK to make a copy and share with your friends, then it is OK. If the copyright holder say it is not OK, then it is not OK, some copyright holders even forbids sharing even a single file from the original program. Buying a game is like buying a ticket to the cinema. You don't own the movie, you have only paid for watching it. You don't own the game (program) you have paid for the right to use it. If you like to own a game (program) then you have to either buy the copyright, pay someone to make a game for you or make the game yourself. When making the game you may not break the copyright for some other game.
Intellectual property is such a touchy subject...
Have you ever read an EULA (End User License Agreement)? You really should start reading that agreement you click past when installing something.
You know that nobody(including you)reads the EULA before the install what they're installing. Don't pretend you do.
I think I read a paragraph or two of one before I got bored reading the Legal lingo.
If you keep the backup copy and use the original as a gift, then your are breaking the law.
When I buy I game I keep it. But I would give out a burnt copy to a friend and in the end they usually end up buying the game. In fact a lot of my LAN parties all work off of a single disc. One of us bought and when we get together we swap the disc around.

This all boils down to this though. Do we own our thoughts and idea's?
You don't own the game (program) you have paid for the right to use it.
Nope...I own the game when I buy it. It's like you selling me a book and saying I can't write out paragraphs from it and put it in an article. It's like saying that it's against the law for me to photocopy pages from it for someone else. What about Ebooks? What about bloody music? We make copies of so many things.

To say when I buy a Computer game I've only bought rights to it is ludicrous and companies know it. If they didn't they would have all gone EA's way and gone DRM. EA's screwed up a huge part of it's business. I will never buy a DRM or secru ROM game. And neither will a lot of other people out there.
Jayhawk
Eminence Grise
posted 10-06-10 04:55 ET (US)     34 / 57       
I think we've given you enough rope to hang yourself, and you ended up doing so. Whether you agree with a law is besides the point. Unless the law changes, you'll have to abide by them or run the risk of facing the consequences.

The laws here are pretty simple, and you've just broken one of them. Time to face the consequences...

Angel Jayhawk
Eyrie • Caesar 4 Heaven • Children of the Nile Heaven • Stronghold Heaven • Caesar 3 Heaven • Emperor Heaven • Pharaoh Heaven • Zeus Heaven • My Deviations
Support your local Heaven • My Recommendations • EXCO • HALO
I believe violence will only increase the cycle of violence. — The Dalai Lama
Peter Fallon
Pleb
(id: Xzyiothe)
posted 10-06-10 05:51 ET (US)     35 / 57       
Heh, there's been people banned for more ambiguous comments. I don't see why people can't humble themselves and hold out on the off-chance their contributions to the community and supposed apologetic acknowledgment of the rule infringement in question could get them a warning instead.

@OP

I can break this problem down into three major components.

1) Game developers won't interact with HG if a harsh line isn't drawn on piracy.

2) Home-grown groups would be more likely to share a close relationship with HG. See: Reverie World Studios.

3) Distributors often hire companies to find pirates so they can contact their ISP. Now let's say one of these people ever found HG and decided to do a sweep of millions of posts for potential pay-dirt with a web spider, I would imagine HG would give away this information under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act it is subject to by having it's server hosted in the state of Illinois. Even if I'm wrong and DMCA doesn't come into play, some of these companies play hard ball and if * a lot * of people were talking about piracy, they may make attacks on the site to give Zen a nudge. In the long run, it's really just to protect you, protect ad revenue and keep the site up to discuss ancient games other sites won't support.

☭ Long live the Turk ☭
"Xzy is the worst parts of kman and legion combined, only with proper spelling so you know he's smart enough to act otherwise if he wasn't such an idiot." - theferret
"Xzy is like all of the terrible Guardian contributors rolled into one person. Proof that you can genetically engineer a humanoid abomination." - Fiindil
Pontius Pilatus
The Elder
posted 10-07-10 12:35 ET (US)     36 / 57       
Hmm, maybe time to put a lock on this thread!

Cheers!

But it ain't necessarily so.
ax_man1
Pleb
posted 10-08-10 00:31 ET (US)     37 / 57       
The lack of morality among the kids posting here is...unsettling.

Let me give you a simple example:

You write and sing a song and record it, and it proves to be extremely popular. You then post it online for 50 cents per download. People start downloading it, and your profits build.

However, someone takes a file of the song, and posts it elsewhere for download for free, without your permission or knowledge. People now see that you can get the song for free at another location rather than yours, and start going there to get it, because free is always good, right?

For them, sure. For you though, your profits start to dwindle and taper off as more and more people go to the site where they can download the song for free (and for free on other sites if it was also posted elsewhere). Your song still costs 50 cents to download on your site, but few people come to your site to download it because they don't want to pay 50 cents when they can get it for free elsewhere. Meanwhile, your song continues to be regularly downloaded by new listeners, but you're getting barely even a fraction of the profit because few are getting it from you.

In other words, your wildly popular song is generating practically no profit for you, despite the fact that people are still regularly downloading it.

----

Pretty basic as far as examples go, but if you still don't get why piracy is wrong (and I didn't even touch on things like ethics or copyright infringement), then there is no helping you.

ax_man1

Owner of a post 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, and 2500
Not all are in the same thread, but 4 of them are
Peter Fallon
Pleb
(id: Xzyiothe)
posted 10-08-10 05:01 ET (US)     38 / 57       
Most backslash of piracy you hear around HG are by gamers who are against DRM. Let me find the little comic..

[JPEG, (190.22 KB)]

Of course this is no excuse. Unless you're some superhero pirate actually helping people play without an internet connection you should just not buy the game, as there's no excuse. If you need to make a statement, tell them that you don't want this. A supposed hit becoming a massive failure will change their tune or put them out of business.


... Although pirates did take down Spore pretty well, I doubt this would work again unless the industry angered Anon.

☭ Long live the Turk ☭
"Xzy is the worst parts of kman and legion combined, only with proper spelling so you know he's smart enough to act otherwise if he wasn't such an idiot." - theferret
"Xzy is like all of the terrible Guardian contributors rolled into one person. Proof that you can genetically engineer a humanoid abomination." - Fiindil
Terikel Grayhair
Imperator
(id: Terikel706)
posted 10-08-10 06:57 ET (US)     39 / 57       
It's like you selling me a book and saying I can't write out paragraphs from it and put it in an article. It's like saying that it's against the law for me to photocopy pages from it for someone else.
This is called plagiarism in most parts of the world, and in most countries it is illegal as well.

Men at Work were recently sued heavily for incorporating the flute whistle in "Down Under." A little piece of music, taken from a larger tune, that they thought was in the public domain. It was not- it was copyrighted, and they had to pay millions.

|||||||||||||||| A transplanted Viking, born a millennium too late. |||||||||||||||||
|||||||||||||||| Too many Awards to list in Signature, sorry lords...|||||||||||||||||
|||||||||||||||| Listed on my page for your convenience and envy.|||||||||||||||||
Somewhere over the EXCO Rainbow
Master Skald, Order of the Silver Quill, Guild of the Skalds
Champion of the Sepia Joust- Joust I, II, IV, VI, VII, VIII
Brugle
HG Alumnus
posted 10-09-10 12:21 ET (US)     40 / 57       
This is called plagiarism
No, it's not. Plagiarism is misrepresenting another person's work as one's own.

By the way, do you really think that expressing your viewpoint will convince many people when you prohibit alternate viewpoints from being expressed? (I'm not against such prohibition if it helps Heaven Games, I'm just questioning your strategy.) Only a weak-minded person would be convinced by an argument when counterarguments are prohibited. An intelligent person would be more likely to reject an argument when counterarguments are prohibited, and in my opinion city-building forumers tend to be intelligent.
Terikel Grayhair
Imperator
(id: Terikel706)
posted 10-10-10 05:57 ET (US)     41 / 57       
I assumed for the quoted bit above that the paragraphs and bits taken out of the book and used for an article were done so without credit to the author given and the new article being under the buyer's own name, as the example led me to believe.

According to what I believe and what you responded, that is indeed plagiarism.

I was not proposing an argument, nor was there a strategy involved. I was merely pointing out that Coldviper's reasoning (if I buy it, it is mine to do with what I please, which includes copying and re-distributing) lacks legal limits that could lead him into trouble in real life if he practices it. Especially at school or uni, where plagiarism (taking other's ideas and words and presenting them as your own) can get you reprimanded, or expelled.

Looking back, maybe there was a strategy. I wanted to give him some subtle advice, and let him learn what the laws and regulations mean before he got himself in some real-life trouble. The example given with the Australian group Men at Work was a recent example of a high pay-out for plagiarism- and that people today can and will get sued over issues concerning intellectual property.

EDIT:
My motivation in writing that is to dispense what I saw as much-needed advice from the goodness of my heart. I can be subtle, but lack true deviousness and depth (I am pretty much a straight-forward type, and never scored higher than 'average' in literature where the deeper meaning always escaped me). But his example struck a chord from an experience I once endured.

I had gotten a 'C' on a research paper concerning railroads and the German victory in the Franco-Prussian war. I felt it better than that, so I took my sources and my paper and went to see the professor.

He explained that I got a 'C' because I had basically re-hashed the information from another book, and I was lucky not to be reported to the Dean for plagiarism. I, of course, had no idea what he was talking about. He pulled a book from his shelf which was a fuller and more indepth version of my paper.

I proved to him that his book was not in the library to which I had access. I showed him the sources, and especially the one page that had a rail map- upon which I had based the paper. I then pointed out that if it matched a book he had that I did not have access to, then my conclusions must have been correct. I got an 'A' for the paper then, and learned how seriously the academic world takes plagiarism. I would merely pass that along to the young man who evidently thinks it okay to take other people's work and present it as his own.
/EDIT.

Sorry if there is any confusion.

|||||||||||||||| A transplanted Viking, born a millennium too late. |||||||||||||||||
|||||||||||||||| Too many Awards to list in Signature, sorry lords...|||||||||||||||||
|||||||||||||||| Listed on my page for your convenience and envy.|||||||||||||||||
Somewhere over the EXCO Rainbow
Master Skald, Order of the Silver Quill, Guild of the Skalds
Champion of the Sepia Joust- Joust I, II, IV, VI, VII, VIII

[This message has been edited by Terikel Grayhair (edited 10-10-2010 @ 02:57 PM).]

Fluttershy
Pleb
(id: Freaky2)
posted 10-11-10 13:28 ET (US)     42 / 57       
The reason people pirate, is because it's easy, free, and the software can be used without limitations.

If the companies want people to buy their software, be it music, ebooks, games, or programs, they need to offer it in a manner that competes with piracy.

When games come out with massively complicated DRM, it encourages people to pirate, so they don't have to deal with the DRM, see Assassin's Creed II, Spore, etc. DRM doesn't work, it just inconveniences the consumer.

In the case of TV shows, if I miss an episode of my favorite TV show, I'm screwed, I can't go somewhere and watch it online. Or can I? I can download it for free. Popular shows are up on the torrent networks mere HOURS after airing on TV.
If they want to stop this, they need to be able to compete.

And as for music, it's easy and free. As simple as that.
A lot of people download songs illegally that they don't even listen to just because they can. Some people download to try the band just because it's easier than Youtube or Grooveshark. The whole discography is just sitting there.

The corporations need to compete with piracy in order to get rid of it. Because demonizing it, and putting restrictions on it isn't stopping it. Piracy will just go further underground and become harder to stop.
It's like marijuana. It's illegal, but many people still do it.

Maybe games should be free, but paid for with ingame ads (Quake Live does this) or offer subscriptions to better services, subscriptions to have a server name listed in the server browser, micro transactions, DLC, etc.
Micro transactions have already proven themselves to be very effective at paying for a game.

For movies and TV shows, put them up for streaming, but with ads, just as if you were watching them on TV.

Music, once again, ads, Band Merchandise, Concert tickets.
The best way for a band to earn money is with concerts and merchandise.

(_̅_̅(̲̲̲̲̲̅̅̅̅̅̅(̅_̅_̲̅marij̲u̲̅an̲̅a̲̅̅_̅_̅_̅()
(is not as helluva drug as pepe)
Jayhawk
Eminence Grise
posted 10-20-10 03:14 ET (US)     43 / 57       
I'm fine with leaving this open as long as people will discuss the issue (pros/cons, etc.) but be careful of what you say. Bragging about your collection of pirated DVDs/CDs/Games whatever will not be appreciated.

PhRAEkay, according to your logic people are allowed to take everything. You could build a house and return one day and find someone else living in it and not be able to do a thing about it after all, you say people should be allowed not to pay for things they want.

People who spend time developing a game, writing a book or writing music all spend time and effort on creating something. Many (most?) of those people would like to see something in return for their effort.

The problem with digital data is that it's so easy to make a copy of something and distribute it. Before digital books you'd have to either steal the physical book, carefully hand copy it or painstakingly run it under a copy-machine to get a copy of a book without paying for it.
You wouldn't think of doing that, now would you?

Now that we have digital versions of books, we'll see the number of proper books sold drop, but I expect the number of digital books sold not to make up the balance.

I agree that it's probably not something that van be reversed, but I sometimes worry about the damage it will do.

Oh, and as for DRM and breaking it, that's just wanting to have your cake and eat it.

Most music is not free, nor are most movies, books and games. They are not free for a reason, so be fair and either get a free equivalent, or pay for them.

Angel Jayhawk
Eyrie • Caesar 4 Heaven • Children of the Nile Heaven • Stronghold Heaven • Caesar 3 Heaven • Emperor Heaven • Pharaoh Heaven • Zeus Heaven • My Deviations
Support your local Heaven • My Recommendations • EXCO • HALO
I believe violence will only increase the cycle of violence. — The Dalai Lama
Vectorgod
Pleb
posted 10-20-10 21:43 ET (US)     44 / 57       
How about a little lighter question on this subject? I currently own 3 copies of C3, with the game installed on 2 desktops in my house and on my recently-deceased laptop. My new laptop came with Windows 7, but the copy of C3 I need to "transfer" from the old laptop to the new laptop is a very early version. As most of you know, the patch will not work with Windows 7. So to get a patched version of the game on my new laptop, I need to install from one of the newer disks which contain the patched version of the game. So does this mean that I need to uninstall the newer version of the game from one of my XP desktops, re-install the game from the early-version disk, then apply the patch on the desktop?

Have a good day!

Vectorgod

PCDania
Pleb
(id: PCD)
posted 10-21-10 06:05 ET (US)     45 / 57       
So does this mean that I need to uninstall the newer version of the game from one of my XP desktops, re-install the game from the early-version disk, then apply the patch on the desktop?
Your question would fit better in the Technical Forum as it's not about why one should pay for playing non-free games but about how to install Caesar 3 on Windows 7, but here goes:

If the newer versions are published by SoldOut you should not have to uninstall as it use a different path but you might like to rename the games main folder anyway, just in case. (check the games path to make sure. The original release of the game by Sierra resides in C:\Program Files\Sierra)
After copying the first-release game to the new laptop (see below), uninstall first from Control Panel, then rename the SoldOut versions main folder back to its original name.

If the newer versions are published by Sierra (Resides in C:\Program Files\Sierra) it should suffice to temporarely rename the games main folder Caesar3 (you can also play it safe and rename the Sierra folder) to something different like OLD_Caesar3 while you install the old version and patch it, then copy it to the new laptop (see below).
For uninstallation simply manually delete the newly installed games mainfolder, then rename the OLD folder back to its original name.

For getting it to run on the new laptop simply copy the newly installed and patched game to the new laptop and create a shortcut to c3.exe on the desktop.
For starting the game load the CD in the drive, close the window that pops up and then start the game using the shortcut. When you some day like to uninstall the game again simply delete the shortcut and the games mainfolder.

An easier option than above is buying the game at GoodOldGames, it cost US$5.99, is compatible with Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7 (32 & 64 bit) and is DRM free.

I hope I managed to explain it in an understandable way, else please make a thread in the Technical Forum and I'll try doing better

"Cats are the only animals that are both uber, pwns and 1337 at the same time." -King Euric
By reading this fine print your soul is now the exclusive property of HeavenGames.

[This message has been edited by PCDania (edited 10-21-2010 @ 06:05 AM).]

Vectorgod
Pleb
posted 10-21-10 13:56 ET (US)     46 / 57       
Sorry for any confusion. I've already taken care of the issue. This was very much a tongue-in-cheek question about the nitty-gritty aspects of EULAs and multiple installs on multiple machines with multiple disks. If you can't laugh at some of this stuff in the "technological age", you might just have to cry!

Have a good day!

Vectorgod

PCDania
Pleb
(id: PCD)
posted 10-22-10 14:00 ET (US)     47 / 57       
Sometimes I would like to cry but unfortunately my keyboard is not for heavy industrial use.

"Cats are the only animals that are both uber, pwns and 1337 at the same time." -King Euric
By reading this fine print your soul is now the exclusive property of HeavenGames.
Vlad Zamolxe
Pleb
posted 07-02-11 13:05 ET (US)     48 / 57       
I think pirated software it's understandable for those who live in poor countries and don't have the money to buy games anyway.
The issue of being a moron occures when you know that you have the money and still pirate it.
CycloneGU
Pleb
posted 07-03-11 11:51 ET (US)     49 / 57       
So in other words, if you can't afford it, it's all right to steal it. I'll remember that next time I want a $90,000 Viper. Granted, I have a relative who once travelled in a poorer area overseas and actually witnessed this pirating; people making copies of programs with valid keys and selling them for $2. I could make a killing doing that.

In any case, on the subject of piracy, I went to reinstall Caesar IV here a month or two back. I could not find on the original box, instruction manual, or CD packaging the key used for the game. After a call to support (which also took several attempts), it was suggested by the SUPPORT REP to look online to find a CD key simply because they no longer support the game (and I wasn't about to buy a new copy for $40 or so when I had already bought one that was not in a prominent location on the packaging). Zeus and Poseidon don't use keys and thus don't have this problem (I own them too), but I had to search online for a replacement key for Caesar IV. I found one and started playing again. This is a rare case where I had to do something like this (I also had to create a backup Emperor CD), but in general I am against piracy if a game is not already owned/purchased.

(Just to clarify, I had called support to try to get a replacement key, but they couldn't even get replacement keys or sell them over the phone - the rep. advised I look online for a code after I mentioned I already own the game, the manual, the original box, and the Rome bonus CD that came with it. I did not explore the option until a rep. told me that in this case it was the only thing he could suggest - and I hate looking for CD keys online too, some hide viruses and spyware stuff in them. He even asked a supervisor for me before suggesting it. *LOL*)

Cyclone

[This message has been edited by CycloneGU (edited 07-03-2011 @ 12:34 PM).]

Senseisan
Pleb
posted 07-04-11 05:18 ET (US)     50 / 57       
A part of piracy is the entire fault of companies .
a ) Why does they sell 50$ a new issued game , and 20$ the same 6 monthes later ?
b ) Why does they release games non properly tested ? I bought CIV some monthes ago , it is a 10$ loss , no matter , but 50$ for this may bore me ...
c ) A proper law must be :
No more support , no more copyright ...
d ) They aim to quantity , no quality , they have rather releasing 20 games a year ( whith a good one a year on two ), than 2 goods a year .It is the best protection against piracy , 90% of the released games don't desserve wasting a CD ...

Situation was quite different 20 or 30 years ago , companies were designers companies , and for them releasing a bad done game was a shame , now they are traders companies , just " sell the stuff as quick and for the more money you can , and forget "


Edit I never used pirated games ...

[This message has been edited by Senseisan (edited 07-04-2011 @ 05:20 AM).]

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