You must be logged in to post messages.
Please login or register

The Town Square
Moderated by Jayhawk

Hop to:    
Welcome! You are not logged in. Please Login or Register.172 replies
Caesar IV Heaven » Forums » The Town Square » Astronomy- discovering the Heavens (and Angels)
Bottom
Topic Subject:Astronomy- discovering the Heavens (and Angels)
« Previous Page  1 2 3 ··· 7  Next Page »
Duan Xuan
Pleb
posted 07-20-01 09:37 ET (US)         
Anybody here who likes astronomy? Interesting topic, especially here...

I read recently that Saturn has been discovered with 12 brand new moons!


D XUAN
AuthorReplies:
Lorentius Orientalis
Pleb
posted 07-20-01 09:56 ET (US)     1 / 172       
Yes, I am interested in astronomy. Recently, I've noticed that Mars is particularly red and bright in the night sky over Japan, when I come home at 9:30. Actually, pondering the cosmos is a source for reflection; given the unimaginable vastness of the universe, I often ponder the significence of our existence---from a non-religious point of view. I also tend to become increasingly philosophical after downing a quantity of sa-ke, like tonight.
Duan Xuan
Pleb
posted 07-20-01 10:04 ET (US)     2 / 172       
Yes, Mars is pretty red.

Only a month ago, it was at it's nearest to Earth. I remember it was a Thursday, and I was busy on C3Heaven and forgot to see it. Come to think of it now, it really is a pity...

And yes, we (human beings) are so small, and even our mother Earth is barely a speck in the Universe...


D XUAN
Ice
Banned
posted 07-20-01 10:04 ET (US)     3 / 172       
I'm very interested in astronomy because it ties in with my interest in cosmology. But I don't keep track of the sky much - I like reading about discoveries and etc etc...
Duan Xuan
Pleb
posted 07-20-01 10:06 ET (US)     4 / 172       
I think cosmology is a bit too boring... Although, yes, the discoveries are very interesting.

D XUAN
GovernorSimulus
Pleb
posted 07-20-01 12:58 ET (US)     5 / 172       
Dose astrology count?

Yep, I used to see all sorts of shows earlier in life on the subject, and in time formed my own (naturaly vary different from the "accepted" perspective) view of what they were talking about (micro-physists too).


It is better to be feared than to be loved, but it is worst of all to be hated.
Jack Noir
Pleb
posted 07-20-01 14:00 ET (US)     6 / 172       
Your August Sirs,

Ice: Do you follow the study of Stellar Structures? Have you seen the images and data that they are getting with Solar Max? Scary! Our nice quiet Sun is extreamly violent!

Can you imagine what a white dwarf or big black hole would be like? We are truly dust.

Regards,

J a c k N o i r

Olivia Chillia
Pleb
posted 07-20-01 14:04 ET (US)     7 / 172       
GS, what do you mean by "earlier in life"? Last week? In third grade?

I find the debate on Pluto's real classification very interesting. Some claim it is a planet while others say it is just a large asteroid. My interest in astronomy (and the Tour de France...go Armstrong!) originate from my childhood expeditions with my Dad and sister in the backyard with our little telescope.

Wasn't the Christmas 2000 eclipse a bit of a disappointment?

I read an interesting SF book a few weeks ago. It is Mutineer's Moon by David Weber. In the story our moon turns out to be a self-aware battleship in orbit over Earth, kept there by a mutiny and the orders of its dying captain before humans had populated our world. The story accounts for our asteroid belt by saying that it is the remains of a planet destroyed by hostile aliens. The main focus is not astronomy, but parts of it are interesting from an astronomical viewpoint.

As for bad science, the made-for-TV movie "Asteroid" (1997) deserves the gold medal. In the opening credits one can hear the asteroids roaring, in space, as they hurtle past the camera. It only goes downhill from there. Here is a link to BadAstronomy.com, with commentary (and facts) about the movie and about real asteroids. http://www.badastronomy.com/bad/tv/asteroid.html


"Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen."

Ice
Banned
posted 07-20-01 14:18 ET (US)     8 / 172       
Jack,

I did read a little on stellar structures and they're pretty amazing. As for white dwarfs...why don't we try a neutron star? About 10 km across but a teaspoon of it weights 10 million tonnes!

[This message has been edited by Ice (edited 07-20-2001 @ 02:18 PM).]

DarthBane
Pleb
posted 07-20-01 14:51 ET (US)     9 / 172       
This is why I love space
Lorentius Orientalis
Pleb
posted 07-20-01 15:49 ET (US)     10 / 172       
Actually, I'd love a bit more space, my apartment is really small by Western standards.
GovernorSimulus
Pleb
posted 07-20-01 19:04 ET (US)     11 / 172       
Olivia Chillia: I mean a few years ago, witch at my age means "earlier in life". Aproximatly between ages 10-13.

It is better to be feared than to be loved, but it is worst of all to be hated.
Jack Noir
Pleb
posted 07-20-01 20:14 ET (US)     12 / 172       
Your August Sirs,

If you are interested in stars, this in one of my favorite pages:
http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov /

It documents our Sun. We are learning a ton, and all of it is new in the last few years!

Ice: Neutrons are kinky for sure, but how violent are they? I like a star with a lot of power output!

Regards,

J a c k N o i r

Ice
Banned
posted 07-20-01 20:51 ET (US)     13 / 172       
Jack: try a quasar then.
GovernorSimulus
Pleb
posted 07-21-01 05:15 ET (US)     14 / 172       
Ice: I thought those were proto-galaxies?

It is better to be feared than to be loved, but it is worst of all to be hated.
Ice
Banned
posted 07-21-01 05:24 ET (US)     15 / 172       
Are they? It's pure speculation though... I'm not to sure what to think about their nature except they sure are powerful....
Duan Xuan
Pleb
posted 07-21-01 21:47 ET (US)     16 / 172       
Dear friends:

Quasars are not necessarily 'proto-galaxies'. However, most of the time they exist in the centre of the most active young galaxies. (That's a bit different from proto-galaxies)

Here's one of my favourite sites for astronomy:

Astronomy.Com


D XUAN

[This message has been edited by Duan Xuan (edited 07-21-2001 @ 09:48 PM).]

Duan Xuan
Pleb
posted 07-21-01 21:51 ET (US)     17 / 172       
And recently, so I read from the Astronomy.com Newsletter, North America is cloudy due to solar activity. But don't worry, the sun's not going to become a red giant until a few billion years more...

Is it really cloudy there, those who live there?


D XUAN
Duan Xuan
Pleb
posted 07-22-01 01:13 ET (US)     18 / 172       
Here is a picture taken from space. It is clouds all over North America:


[Uniform Resource for image URL not supported.]

Sorry, I am editing this post because I can't seem to get the pic. up! How do I do it?


D XUAN

[This message has been edited by Duan Xuan (edited 07-22-2001 @ 01:15 AM).]

Olivia Chillia
Pleb
posted 07-22-01 11:04 ET (US)     19 / 172       
I thought a quasar was a very small star spinning very fast and giving off radio waves so it looks as though it flashes.

"Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen."

GovernorSimulus
Pleb
posted 07-22-01 16:57 ET (US)     20 / 172       
Olivia: that would be a pulsar. Yes astronomy-master Duan Xuan?

It is better to be feared than to be loved, but it is worst of all to be hated.
Ice
Banned
posted 07-22-01 21:47 ET (US)     21 / 172       
Pulsars are believed to be very fast-spinning neutron stars. No one yet knows what quasars are....lots of speculations though....
Duan Xuan
Pleb
posted 07-23-01 09:48 ET (US)     22 / 172       
Haha, G Simulus! I started astronomy at around 5 years old. I used to start on Paleontology (at 4) but then I read about what asteroids wiping out the Dinos and then turned to astronomy!

Ice, I read that pulsars are actually neutron stars (something like that. It was a dead star). They spin at extremely high speeds that is (if I remember correctly) 30 times per second!

I think stellar evolution (do you call the star's growth this?) is the most interesting...


D XUAN
Ice
Banned
posted 07-23-01 10:01 ET (US)     23 / 172       
Correct, DX, neutron stars with a high spin rate. But it's also something to do with their internal axis. The most interesting ones are those in binary systems, where the opposing star cause the pulsar to 'wobble', spinning slightly off its normal axis.

And yes, stellar evolution is interesting...imagine nebulae that are created from one single star exploding! Of course, I'm interested in cosmology as well....

Duan Xuan
Pleb
posted 07-23-01 10:05 ET (US)     24 / 172       
Well, our earth will also wobble off its present axis in thousands of years. It is called a platonic year (for the earth to wobble back again).

Well, the stars are created from those clouds. Very beautiful! Especially the Horsehead Nebula. Simply miraculous!


D XUAN
GovernorSimulus
Pleb
posted 07-23-01 13:29 ET (US)     25 / 172       
All Hail Star Master Duan Xuan! *bows vary flamboyantly*

It is better to be feared than to be loved, but it is worst of all to be hated.
« Previous Page  1 2 3 ··· 7  Next Page »
You must be logged in to post messages.
Please login or register

Hop to:    

Caesar IV Heaven | HeavenGames