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Caesar IV Heaven » Forums » Emperor: Game Help » The power of residential walls
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Topic Subject:The power of residential walls
Secateur
Pleb
posted 09-13-02 06:32 ET (US)         
Can anyone explain the idea behind the actual desiberality effects of residential walls? I experimented with a mill and some walls, and I didn't understand the results.

A mill is an undesirable building. Ok. Placing one tile of wall next to it, blasts away about a third of the negative desirability, in the general direction of the wall. Uh, wow! This was quite a lot heavier than I expected. Placing a second tile of wall next to the mill and the first tile, effectively set the mill's desirability range to one. Man! Does these things work or what? However, I can't understand that a house with one tile between itself and a mill, won't know the mill's even there if you just happen tho have a wall on the other side of the mill! ANyone?

AuthorReplies:
Merepatra
HG Alumnus
posted 09-13-02 06:53 ET (US)     1 / 21       
Residential walls completely block negative desirability from coming through the wall and actually have a postitive desirability themselves of +3, +2, +1, which is why you were almost negating the mills undesirability with only a couple of sections of wall. Apparently they can't see the mill over the wall
Secateur
Pleb
posted 09-13-02 07:22 ET (US)     2 / 21       
I might have worded myself badly. I'm perfectly ok with people being unable to see the mill, if there's a wall inbetween. What I can't understand is that they can't see the mill when it's the mill that's inbetween.
Jayhawk
Eminence Grise
posted 09-13-02 07:43 ET (US)     3 / 21       
They must be blinded by the beauty of the unseen wall, Secateur

[Edit]
I don't think any body tried that during testing...

[This message has been edited by Jayhawk (edited 09-13-2002 @ 07:44 AM).]

aoerana
Pleb
posted 09-13-02 15:42 ET (US)     4 / 21       
I was wondering about this. Thanks

The notes do say that walls block the negative effects of undesirable buildings. It does not specify just one side. I think that the deal was that it was easier to code entire building effects then to have partial effects removed/blocked.

ramases_88
Pleb
posted 09-13-02 21:28 ET (US)     5 / 21       
So walls don't have to be complete to have affect..... right? They can just go in front of a building and the un-disierability is gone..... right? ...??
MarvL
Pleb
posted 09-13-02 23:03 ET (US)     6 / 21       
Kilns have negative desirability of -30,-25,-20,-15,-10,-5
Residential Walls have positive desirability of 3,2,1

The following desirability image contains 2 Kilns and 1 section of Residential Wall.
[GIF, (210.79 KB)]
As you can see, the rather surprising result is that a Residential Wall ANYWHERE in the Negative Desirability field effectively reduces the Range of the ENTIRE building to that distance for the entire radius.

Residential Walls are quite a lot more powerful than you might have thought.


Extend your grasp of the Empire at Serpentineum
Nero Would
Pharaolympics 2000 Competitor
posted 09-14-02 00:23 ET (US)     7 / 21       
I don't have the released version of the game (yet) so this is from the demo.

If I build an undesirable building on its own, well away from anything else, and then place one tile of wall at a distance of (say) 2 tiles, the buildings negative appeal stops at a distance of 2 tiles from the building (in all directions). But in a more complicated situation, with several buildings close to each other, a single wall tile does not always stop the negative appeal in all directions, and it may take 2 tiles of wall on different sides of the building to stop its negaive appeal.

JimMRooney
Pharaolympics 2000 Competitor
posted 09-16-02 12:57 ET (US)     8 / 21       
Has anyone thought about their effect on desirable structures? A while ago, I remember BAChuck saying that they also "blocked" desirability as well as undesirability. I wonder if placing a garden next to a res. wall is a waste of money. Do res walls need to be at least 10 tiles away from palaces in order to get the full desirability? If so, that seems like the greatest layout challenge.
VitruviusAIA
The Architect
posted 09-16-02 14:07 ET (US)     9 / 21       
At least in the beta version, residential walls did not block positive desirability, only negative. I believe that this is the same in the retail version.

You will still get the positive desirability of a structure even if there is a residential wall between the structure and your housing. In fact, residential walls will add to the desirability with their own. Residential walls have desirability of +3, +2, +1. A continuous row of residential walls can produce desirability of +15 all by itself due to the accumulative nature of desirability.


Vaia
aoerana
Pleb
posted 09-16-02 16:05 ET (US)     10 / 21       
So we could eventually have Elegant housing next to Industrial sections?
Nero Would
Pharaolympics 2000 Competitor
posted 09-16-02 16:17 ET (US)     11 / 21       

Quoted from aoerana:

So we could eventually have Elegant housing next to Industrial sections?

Yes, you certainly can. It does seem as though that takes away some of the challenge of designing the city, but I haven't played enough yet to decide if I think it is a serious disadvantage.

HermannTLombard
Pleb
posted 09-17-02 10:38 ET (US)     12 / 21       
There may be a tradeoff between the decreased challenge due to residential walls and the increased challenge of perfect feng shui...however I'd say that having a wall on the far side negating the effects on the near side is, at best, an "undocumented feature."
Wendoolicus
Guest
posted 09-19-02 16:02 ET (US)     13 / 21       
Just a Q. Any relevance about the colour of walls? Do the different colours mean anything?
EJay
Pleb
(id: EmperorJay)
posted 09-19-02 16:14 ET (US)     14 / 21       
No, as far as I know there no diffirence except for colour, and gate shapes.
JimMRooney
Pharaolympics 2000 Competitor
posted 09-19-02 16:18 ET (US)     15 / 21       
No difference. Its just a matter of personal taste. You can even mix and match gates and walls from one to the other.

(Whoops. Not fast enough. I get distracted so easily. )

[This message has been edited by JimMRooney (edited 09-19-2002 @ 04:19 PM).]

Wendoolicus
Guest
posted 09-19-02 16:21 ET (US)     16 / 21       
Thanks folks I think I like the brown ones with the fancy emblem on them
JimMRooney
Pharaolympics 2000 Competitor
posted 09-19-02 16:37 ET (US)     17 / 21       
That's a good one. I usually use that one and the red one on the same map for different neighborhoods. (Doesn't red mean good luck and prosperity in Chinese tradition?)
Wendoolicus
Guest
posted 09-19-02 16:49 ET (US)     18 / 21       
Am not too sure JimMRooney - I do know that Chinese brides wear red, which I saw in Hong Kong many years ago. They looked stunning!!

Just found the following:

"Red is the colour of life. It is the colour of our blood. Red energizes us. It symbolizes courage, will, determination and succeeding.

If you worry a lot, think of the colour of red in the rainbow, and it will help you overcome negative thoughts.

Pink is the colour of unconditional love. Rosy pink transforms love into a spiritual force that nourishes and heals. If you need more love in your life, imagine you are surrounded by pink light."

AND ANOTHER (interesting site)

"THE COLOUR SYMBOLISM OF THE ZHI
Colour symbolism has always been extremely important to the Chinese, but it varies considerably over time. Thus it is extremely important to know what period of Chinese history is under discussion when one speaks of the particular symbolism of a colour. According to early Chinese colour theory, each dynasty was assigned a colour in a black-white-red cycle. Thus, of the first three historical dynasties, Xia was black, Shang was white, and Zhou was red (Bauer, 1976, p. 78).

In Shang and Zhou times, red and black were the two colours most highly esteemed, because they were the most expensive to use for dyeing textiles. Thus the clothes of ancient officials would have been made of white silk decorated mainly with black and red. In addition, treasured lacquer vessels and other painted objects which have survived in tombs of the Western Zhou period show exactly this same colour scheme, with black and red patterns inlaid with sparkling white shells (Plate 44). Due to the strength of the belief in colour symbolism in China, one is tempted to try to associate the colours black and red with the ancient concepts of yin and yang. But this symbolism cannot be confirmed prior to the Han period."


See this site

JimMRooney
Pharaolympics 2000 Competitor
posted 09-19-02 17:02 ET (US)     19 / 21       
Thank you, Wendoolicus. Always nice to learn something about other cultures.
Jayhawk
Eminence Grise
posted 09-20-02 06:50 ET (US)     20 / 21       
I like the ones with the round gates
JimMRooney
Pharaolympics 2000 Competitor
posted 09-20-02 15:11 ET (US)     21 / 21       
Those have a very big following, Jayhawk. Alot of people say that's their favorite (gray I believe). For some reason, I always associate the round gate with a garden. Isn't it officially called a moon gate?
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